Targeted therapies and SCLC

So far, there has been very little progress with treatment options for patients with Small Cell Lung  Cancer.

 

This may change now as there has been some exciting development.

“New targeted therapy shows promise against small cell lung cancer”

 

from the article:

Dr M. Catherine Pietanza, MD, an Assistant Attending Physician at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, USA, will report on results from a phase I trial of a novel agent, rovalpituzumab tesirine (Rova-T, or S16LD6.5), in 79 patients with SCLC who had progressed after first line (given when the disease is newly diagnosed) or second line therapy (given when the disease progresses or recurs).

This is HUGE news and mayline up a new wave of developments coming in the next few years.

 

Hopefully just in time to have an impact on Mum’s progress.

 

Read more about it HERE

Targeted therapies and SCLC

CenteWatch

Clinical Trials, as I have posted before, can offer some hope where there hasn’t been any, and many patient advocates in the Lung Cancer community have had great results.

CentreWatch is a great resource at finding one you can participate in.

 

What’s even better is that they list international trials as well so if you don’t happen to be in the US, don’t give up. There may be one suitable for you.

Current trials for SCLC are listed HERE

 

CenteWatch

It’s starting to feel a lot like Christmas

I can’t lie. I have been absolutely dreading the holidays this year.

Earlier last month, when we found out about the diagnosis, I really wasn’t sure there’d be much to celebrate at all and I was more than scared about the build up.

But every now and then somebody throws you a bone and in this case it means that Mum is well enough to come home until the 29th.

 

She’ll be released on the 23rd, the day I get back and has already been busy thinking about what I shall cook for her when I’m at hers. She can walk around with an aide but obviously there’s no way that she’d be able to take care of herself.

 

I’m so so happy we get to spend the week together like this.

 

Dad already has a shopping list with things she’d like to eat so that I can pamper her when I’m there.

 

And now even grumpy old me feels a bit festive.

It’s starting to feel a lot like Christmas

The Faces of Lung Cancer 7

I normally post about famous people who died of lung cancer, but today I want to write about loss and friendship.

 

Or better: I want to point you towards Linnea, who is living with the disease and writes about the loss of a friend who happened to have Lung Cancer and what it’s like having to go through this time and time again.

 

This part’s really hard

The Faces of Lung Cancer 7

#LCSMchat next topic has been announed

On 17/12 the community will reflect on 2015 and the advancements it’s brought to Lung Cancer patients.

T1: What do you feel were the key highlights for the lung cancer community in 2015?

T2: What are the leading challenges the lung cancer community still faces for the near future?

T3: What are your predictions for realistic next advances in lung cancer in 2016?

T4: Dreaming big, what’s on your wish list of what you’d love to see for the lung cancer community next year?

The chat will take place 8PM Eastern, 5 PM Pacific time, so I’m unlikely to be able to make it, but I’ll give a recap here.

 

 

#LCSMchat next topic has been announed

Christmas card Competition

Roy Castle have a new competition going to find their new Christmas Card designs for 2016.

There are severall age groups, so anyone can participate.

All designs will then be open to public vote where you can chose your favourite.

All designs have to be submitted by January 8th, and you find more info here:

http://www.roycastle.org/support-us/christmas-card-competition

 

Christmas card Competition

New NSCLC drug approved by the FDA

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Alecensa (alectinib) to treat people with advanced ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that has become worse after treatment with another targeted therapy drug called Xalkori (crizotinib). It’s also for people who could not tolerate taking Xalkori in the first place.

 

Find out more HERE

 

This is amazing news as this will mean another push towards a longer life expectance for many sufferers of NSCLC who otherwise would not have many options left.

Let’s now hope there’s some good news  soon for SCLC as well!

New NSCLC drug approved by the FDA